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Bacteriological Profile and Susceptibility Pattern of Septicemic NICU and PICU Children of a Tertiary Care Rural Hospital in Amritsar, India.and PICU Children of a Tertiary Care Rural Hospital in Amritsar, India.

Authore(s) : Parmeet Kaur || Sri Guru Ramdas Institute of Medical Sciences and ResearchVallah AmritsarPunjab.

Volume : (3), Issue : 211, January - 2019

Abstract :  Septicemia, a common cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates and children is caused by a wide spec- trum of constantly changing bacteria. Prompt recognition of the pathogen and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are the key determinants of positive outcome in this serious pediatric emergency. Bacteriological culture from blood sample of the patient remains the mainstay of diagnosis of septicemia. Blood cultures, collected both by conventional and BacTalert methods, were performed on 100 NICU and PICU septicemic patients of a tertiary care hospital and their bacteriological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was studied. Among 41 (41%) culture positive blood samples of neonates, MRSA was the predominant isolate being 11/41 ( 26.8%) , followed by MSSA 7/41 (17.1%), Acinetobacter  sp, Enterobacter sp and CONS each 5/41 (12.2%).E. coli were 4/41(9.8%),Klebsiella  sp3/41 (7.3%)and only 1of 41(2.4%) was Citrobacter sp. Out of 30 (30%) culture positive blood samples from PICU, MRSA isolates  were highest, 12/30(40%)  , followed by Acinetobacter sp being 5/30(16.7%), E coli4/30 (13.3%), MSSA &Enterobacter sp each 3/30 (10%). 2 Ps.aeruginosa(6.7%) and 1 Klebsiella sp(3.3%) were also isolated. Most of the gram positive organisms were sensitive to Amikacin, Levofloxacin and Vancomycin. Gram negative isolates were mainly sensitive to Piperacillin- Tazobactam combination followed by Amikacin and Imipenem. There were 8 ESBL and 2 MBL producers. In wake of high incidence and morbidity & mortality due to sepsis in neonates and children, there is need for surveil- lance at regular intervals to know the changing pathogen profile and their susceptibility patterns so as to formulate policies on rational use of antibiotics and infection control.  

Keywords :Bacteriological, Profile , Susceptibility, Pattern ,Septicemic NICU , PICU Children.

Article: Download PDF Journal DOI : 2364/2018

Cite This Article:

Septicemia, NICU, PICU, MRSA.

Vol.I (3), Issue.I 211


Article No : 10015


Number of Downloads : 109


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