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The metamorphosis of predicate extensions: A morpholexical study of verb extensions in the Shona language

Authore(s) : Francis Matambirofa || Senior LecturerAfrican Languages and LiteratureUniversity of ZimbabweEmail: fmatambirofa@gmail.com.

Volume : (13), Issue : 205, January - 2019

Abstract : This article explores the behaviour of verb extensions in the Shona language from historical linguistics and empirical points of view. Its main thrust is based on two related arguments. The first is that not every extension can pair with every other verb in the language. I refer to the ability or otherwise of a given extension to couple and derive a meaningful construction with a verb as its semantic compatibility. The corollary is that there are semantic compatibility constraints that need to be accounted for, which impede a free-for-all co-occurrence of verbs and extensions in the language. The second related argument is that different extensions exhibit varying levels of semantic compatibility with verbs, a phenomenon that I refer to as productivity. The main argument of this article is therefore that the interfacing of semantic compatibility and productivity provides clues to groups of extensions’ relative morpholexical evolution in the language.

Keywords :Shona language, verb extensions, semantic compatibility, verb productivity, metamorphosis, serial verb constructions, transitive verb, intransitive verb.  

Article: Download PDF Journal DOI : 301/704

Cite This Article:

A morpholexical study of verb extensions

Vol.I (13), Issue.I 205


Article No : 10033


Number of Downloads : 102


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